BALLYMENA 1914-1918

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Randalstown Old Congregation Presbyterian Church

Men Associated with Randalstown Area

This is a work in progress.  You still might find it useful and may be able to help us.  Some names are already in the Virtual Memorial and others appear here. There are also relevant names in the sections relating to Canadian, Australian and New Zealand soldiers. It is reported that about 250+ men from the area served.

ADAIR, Rifleman George, 2243, 'D' Coy, 11th Royal Irish Rifles, died on 16th August 1917, the first day of the Battle of Langemarck, a phase of the Battle of Passchendaele (3rd Ypres).  His name is recorded on the Tyne Cot Memorial.  He was the son of Mary Adair, of Seacash, British, Crumlin, Co. Antrim, and the late James Adair.
Widower and railway worker (plate layer) James Adair had married  Mary Richardson, a servant, in Antrim's 2nd Presbyteriam Church on the 27 December 1892. The couple had had six children by the time of the 1911 census but one, David,  had died aged 20 on the 18 November 1909 at Church Street, Antrim. George was their eldest surviving son and had been born on the 20 January 1896 at Fountain Street, Antrim.
In 1901 and 1911 they were living at Seacash, Antrim.

Rifleman William Henry Anderson, Royal Irish Rifles.
Photograph from Ballymena Weekly Times,  Jun 1917 & courtesy of N Henderson
ANDERSON, William Henry, 19376, Rifleman, 11th  Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action on the opening day of the Somme on 1st July 1916.  He is buried Contalmaison Chateau Cemetery, Somme.
He was born in Broughshane on the 7 December 1894, worked as a clerk at the Old Bleach Linen Factory, Randalstown and he enlisted in Antrim.  He was the youngest son of James and Mary Anderson, Shane's Cottage, Randalstown. James was then employed by Lord O'Neill. His wife's maiden name was Mary Ann Thompson.
James Anderson was a former policeman, an ex-RIC Sergeant, who had been stationed at Portrush, Ballymoney and Broughshane. All four of his known sons served in the forces during the Great War.  William Henry and his brother Samuel A served in the Royal Irish Rifles. Albert and Robert James Anderson served in the CEF. Albert (Service number 192165), a policeman living in Toronto, was severely wounded in the left shoulder while serving at Vimy Ridge with the 15th Battalion, Canadian Infantry and he was eventually returned 'medically unfit' to Canada. 751406 Private Robert James Anderson, a store manager, joined the 118th Battalion and served with the 2nd Pioneers. He lived in London, Ontario with his wife Christina V Anderson.

192165 Private Albert Anderson, 15th Battalion Canadian Infantry, brother of William Henry, Samuel A and Robert James Anderson.
BELL, Rifleman  Andrew, 3735, 11th Royal Irish Rifles, having been captured on the Somme on the 1st July 1916, died a POW on 15th July 1916 and is buried in Hamburg Cemetery, Germany.
POW records show collectively that he died at 4.00 pm that day in the camp hospital at Minden of wounds to the stomach (Bauchschuss), though a more detailed record in French reads as follows: 'blessure au ventre, pneumonie et pluresie' - stomach wound, pneumonia and pleurisy. It says he was buried in the Minden French Cemetery and that a wooden cross with his name was erected and, referring to the body adds, 'et pourra etre retrouvee plus tard', it will be recovered later, hence its reburial in Hamburg Cemetery. the Germans knew he wouldn't survive and the French version of the record says , 'Bell a ete visite par un ecclesiastique' - Bell was visited by a cleric.
He had lived in Ballygrooby, Randalstown and his name is recorded in Randalstown OC listing. The Belfast Weekly Telegraph gives his address as 80 McTier Street.
Local records show he was born on the 3 May 1897 (POW record says 30/5/1897) at Ballylurgan, Drummaul and he was the son of William. William Bell had married Sarah McDowell in Drummaul Parish Church on the 22 September 1893.


Brothers Andrew & James Bell, 80 McTier Street Belfast and formerly of Ballygrooby, Randalstown Antrim


(the above text says 'and James was killed'.) This is not 18/924 James Bell (below). The James referred to was the eldest son of William and Sarah Bell and James McDowell Bell was born at 11, Steen Street, Belfast on the 19 November 1893. The other eight children of the  family were all born around Randalstown.

James Bell, brother of Andrew, is 4420 James McDowell Bell, 14th Royal Irish Rifles, killed in action on the 10th October 1916 and buried at Pond Farm Cemetery. CWGC have him incorrectly listed as J M C D Bell.)

Photograph courtesy of N Henderson

BELL, Rifleman James, 18/924, 11th Royal Irish Rifles, aged 19, died on 29th May 1917 and is buried in Pond Farm Cemetery. The unit War Diary says that at 4.00am on that date the Germans 'attempted to raid Battalion (12th Royal Irish Rifles) on our right. Barrage extended to out right company causing 7 casualties - 4 killed and 3 wounded.'  James Bell was one of the killed; the others were 18/727 A. McLean, Bracknamuckley, Portglenone, 1285 Samuel John Douglas, Ravarnette, Lisburn, and 18/677 S H Walker, Mallusk.
He was the son of James Murdoch Bell, Ballybracken, Doagh, Co. Antrim, & late Jane Graham Bell.
James Murdoch Bell, aged 27 and a sailor at that time, had married Jane Graham, a 25 year old servant, in St Anne's Parish Church, Belfast on the 19 February 1890.  His address was then 82, Lilliput Street and she was living at 5, Union Place, Great Georges Street, Belfast. Son James was born on the 18 March 1895 at Ballybracken, Kilbride.


BELL, Private John Arthur: 3568 Private John Arthur (sometimes Arthur John) Bell, Irish Guards, was the son of John Arthur Bell, a carpenter, and his wife Elizabeth, nee Millar, a teacher from Dervock, near Ballymoney.  The couple had married on 14 April 1876. John Arthur was born at Shane's Castle, Randalstown on the 10 December 1890 and was one of eight children born of the Bell marriage; four were still alive in 1911.

The report of the 23 year old being a prisoner of war was incorrect and the CWGC list him as being killed on the 1 September 1914. The record shows a search was made for Bell, Arthur J 'soldat 3568 au Irish Guards, 3 Comp, disparu le 1er Sept combat de Compiegues' (soldier 3568 Irish Guards, 3rd Company, disappeared 1st September in combat at Compiegues (sic - probably Compiegne). The outcome appears to have been that there were various men named Bell being held in POW camps but Arthur Bell was not one of them.

The 1901 census return, on which Arthur's name appears, and 1911 census return record the family at Shane's Castle, and the CWGC give the parents' later address as 'Gwenville', Comber, Belfast. John Arthur Bell is commemorated on the La Ferte-Sous-Jouarre, Memorial.

Ballymena Weekly Telegraph photograph

BELL, Private Robert, 139509, Canadian Infantry, enlisted in Toronto on the 15 July 1915, naming Mrs Mary Jane Linton, Edenduff, Shane's Castle, Milltown, Randalstown as his next of kin.  He joined the 75 Battalion but transferred to the 60th Battalion for service in France.  He served from June 1916 to February 1917, being wounded at the latter date.  Shrapnel tore a gash in his right forearm and he was eventually sent to Canada in September 1917 for further treatment. He recovered.
He died on the 19 August 1944. 
See Ballymena Canadians
BOYD, 140021 Private Matthew enlisted in the 75th Battalion, Canadian Infantry on the 23 July 1915 and said he had previously served in a militia, the 9th Mississauga Horse. He said he was originally from Taylorstown, Grange Corner, Toome and his mother was Caroline Nicholl-Boyd of Taylorstown, later of Dunturky, Ballynure. He was wounded on the 7th November 1917 while attached to the 5th Light Mortar Battery and died of his wounds at No. 10 Casualty Clearing Station.
See Ballymena Canadians
BOYD, 11894 Rifleman William James, 15th Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action on the Somme on 1 July 1916. He is named on the Thiepval Memorial.
He was born in Drummaul, Co. Antrim and had married Annie Cobain, 21, Limestone Road, Belfast in Trinity Parish Church, Belfast on the 24 October 1905. He then lived at 24, Lawther Place, Belfast. He enlisted in Belfast, but he is remembered Drummaul Parish Church.
Widow Annie Boyd, nee Cobain, married widower Samuel Hoy in Ballylinney Presbyterian Church on the 8 October 1918. Both then lived at Kilbride.  CWGC says he was the husband of A. Hoy, Drummaragh, Doagh.
BRADY, 28735 Private Patrick, 6th Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, was killed in action on October 7th, 1918 and he is buried in Bellicourt British Cemetery, France. He was said to be aged 33 and to be born at Killyfast, the son of John of Portlee/Ballynamullan. His wife Margaret lived at Staffordstown, Randalstown.
The Irish census of 1911 shows Patrick Brady, 35 and a farmer, and his wife Margaret (37) living at Gillistown, Ballyscullion  with their four children: James Henry, 9 and born in the USA, Hugh Francis, 7 and born in  the USA, Rose Ann, 4 and born in the USA, and Mary Ellen, 2 and born in Co. Antrim.
Ballynamullan, Portlee, Killyfast, Gillistown and Staffordstown are all adjacent townlands near Randalstown and just north of Lough Neagh.                                                                                                                  See Virtual Memorial for fuller details.
BROWN, Private George, 17678, Private. 108th Company, Machine Gun Corps (Inf) and formerly 19404 of the 11 Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action on July 1st, 1916. He is buried in Connaught Cemetery, Somme. He cannot be positively identified but is remembered in Dundrod Presbyterian Church and was probably born on the 18 May 1896, the son of Robert and Agnes Brown, nee Harper, Randox, Killead, Co Antrim.                                                                          See Virtual Memorial for fuller details.
BRUCE, Private Robert, 24049, 13th Bn The King's (Liverpool Regiment), was killed in action on the 16 August 1916, and he is named on the Thiepval Memorial. The 13th Battalion says as follows: 'made an attack on enemy lines south of Guillemont. Casualties heavy.'
He was born at Cloghogue, Duneane (There are two townlands named Cloghogue. Cloghogue, Duneane is near Toome/Toomebridge and Cloghogue, Drummaul is near Ahoghill) on the 8 February 1882, the son of farmer William and carpenter's daughter Sarah Ann Bruce, nee Stewart, both of Cloghogue, Duneane. The family were at Cloghogue in 1901 and 1911. Local press said Taylorstown, contiguous or the same place, and he enlisted in Manchester.
See Virtual Memorial
CAMPBELL, Private John, 84821, 13th King's Liverpool Regiment, died on the 22nd November 1917 and is buried in Favreuil British Cemetery, Pas de Calais. 
The unit were mainly in camp during early November 1917, specifically Camp No 7 at Beugnatre, north of Bapaume, and for most of this period were engaged in training.  Their 'C' Company did carry out a trench raid on the 6th November and they had one man killed and six wounded. They didn't actually leave the camp until they moved into Brigade Reserve on the 20th November, and then from 20th - 24th November they were assigned to fatigues, to 'carrying parties'. They returned to Camp 7 on the 24th November and did not go into the trenches until the 29th November 1917. It would seem likely he was hit doing this work with carrying parties, his burial being close to the area where the unit were working.
He was born in Randalstown.
CARLISLE, 306911 Private Thomas McLenaghan, 1/8th The King's (Liverpool Regiment), was killed in action on 11 September 1916, and he is named on Thiepval Memorial, Somme. He was born at Ballytresna, Randalstown on the 7 August 1895 and was the son of farmer Thomas Carlisle and his wife Eliza Ann Hives. The couple married in Ballymena Registrar's Office on the 22 June 1891. He was at Ballytresna, Drummaul in 1901 and 1911 but he enlisted and lived Liverpool. There were seven children in the family by 1911- Rose (Roseanna, 1891), William John (1893), Thomas McLenaghan (1895), Maria (1897), Samuel (1899), Elizabeth Ann (1901) and Agnes Parker (1904).                                See Virtual Memorial for fuller details.
CASSIDY, 3/7820 CSM Charles, Depot Somerset Light Infantry, was born in Randalstown, County Antrim and was an old soldier. Between leaving the Army and re-enlisting for service in the Great War, Charles worked as an Pensioner Messenger for Customs in London. He died suddenly and aged 60 years in the Sergeant’s Mess of the Somerset Light Infantry Depot in Taunton after a church parade on 13 February 1916. He is buried in Taunton (St Mary’s) Cemetery.
He had married Mary Ann Eliza Jolliffe on the 30th August 1883 at Portland, and together they had one son and two daughters. His son also died in 1916 - see below.   The CWGC lists him as the husband of Ann Cassidy, of Wareham Road., Corfe Mullen, Wimborne, Dorset.
CASSIDY, 16794 Pte Charles, 2nd Bn Dorset Regiment, son of CSM Charles Cassidy of Randalstown, was born on the 30 November 1891 in Taunton, Devon.  He had enlisted in the Royal Navy on the 15 September 1910 and had served as a 2nd Class Mate/Cooks Mate before being discharged as unsuitable on the 4th May 1911.
He served as an infantryman with the unfortunate 2nd Dorsets in Mesopotamia during the Great War and died at sea aged 24 on the 19th July 1916. He is commemorated on the Chatby Memorial, near Alexandria, Egypt.
In August 1914 the 2nd Battalion Dorsetshire Regiment was in Poona, India, and they were part of 16th Indian Brigade in Poona Division. They landed in the Persian Gulf on the 6 November 1914, assigned to the campaign in Mesopotamia, part of Indian Expeditionary Force ‘D’. The Battalion was later among those units captured by the Turks at Kut-el-Amara on the 29 April 1916. During the siege at Kut, a composite battalion, the “English Composite Battalion”, was created from returned wounded and others of the 2nd Dorsets and 2nd Norfolks. It was under command of the 21st Indian Brigade, 7th Indian Division. This unit was broken up on 21 July 1916 and the 2nd Dorsets re-established. It transferred to 9th Indian Brigade, 3rd (Lahore) Division in January 1917 and moved to Egypt in April 1918.
Private Charles Cassidy died two days before the composite battalion was reorganised. The War Diary for the 19th July says, ‘Companies were at disposal of Company Commanders for training and instruction’, but he had died of disease or of old wounds while in transit to Egypt.
CLARKE, 243 Rifleman Robert John, 12th Royal Irish Rifles, aged 21, was killed in action on September 2nd, 1918, and he is buried in Nieuwkerke Churchyard, Belgium. He was born in Randalstown enlisted Belfast, and lived Taylorstown. He was the grandson of Mary Ann Underwood, Groggan, Randalstown. He is commemorated in Grange Presbyterian Church.
                                                                                                                                                                   See Virtual Memorial.
COLLINS, Private James, 3659, 6th Royal Irish Fusiliers, aged 22, died on the 29th December 1915 and is buried in Salonika (Lembet Road) Cemetery. 
6th Bn. Royal Irish Fusiliers was formed in September 1914 and were to become part of the 31st Brigade in the 10th (Irish) Division. They left Liverpool on the 7th July 1915 and went to Gallipoli, landing at Suvla Bay on the 7th August 1915. They were moved to Salonika in October 1915. Collins' Medal Index Card indicates he went on active service there on the 6th November 1915 and died about a month after his arrival.
James Collins was the son of Charles Collins and Emily O'Hara and he was born at Ballygrooby, Randalstown on the 25 January 1894. His parents, railway labourer Charles of Shane Street, Randalstown and mill worker Emily O'Hara, Ballygrooby, Drummaul, had married in Randalstown RC Chapel on the 26 December 1892. They were living at Ballygrooby in 1901 and 1911.
CWGC says he was the brother of Harry Collins, of Ballygrooby, Randalstown, Co. Antrim.
COULTER, 7263 Rifleman James, 11th Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action on the Somme on 1 July 1916 and he is named Thiepval Memorial, Somme.
He was born on the 18 October 1896 at Glebe, Ahoghill and was the son of Robert Coulter and Ellen Campbell, later of Creagh, Randalstown (1901) and Drumanaway, Randalstown (1911).

COULTER, 267106 Lance Corporal Thomas J , 6th Royal Highland Regiment (Black Watch), was killed in action on the 28 May 1918 and he is buried in Ecoivres Military Cemetery, France.

He was born on the 8 October 1889 at Crossland Road, Glasgow, the son of Mr. and Mrs. N. Coulter, of Govan, Glasgow. He enlisted in Glasgow and lived in White Street, Govan (Crookston Street, Glasgow in 1901).  He had married Matilda Wylie on the 31 December 1913 in St Anthony's RC Church, Glasgow and she lived at Drumsough, Randalstown.     See Virtual Memorial

CUNNINGHAM,  Joseph, 81534, Private, 134th Field Ambulance, RAMC, died on 28th July 1916 and he is buried in Bethune Town Cemetery.  He was the 31 year old son of James and Rose Cunningham, Randalstown and he was born on the 8 June 1886 at Shane's Castle. Rose was his older twin sister.
He was the husband of E Cunningham, 40, Duncruin Street, Maryhill, Glasgow, Scotland. See Virtual Memorial for fuller details.
CUPPLES, 2138287 Private David, 31st Bn Canadian Infantry (Alberta Regiment),  was killed in action on 11 October 1918. He was born on the 1 March 1889, the son of David Cupples and Jane Wilson, Kells, Ballymena.  'Loftman' David, son of Samuel, had married Jane Wilson, a weaver from Kildrum and daughter of engineman John, in Randalstown OC Presbyterian Church on the 17 July 1878. He is buried Queant Communal Cemetery British Extension, Pas de Calais and commemorated in Kells Presbyterian Church.                                                                                                               See Ballymena Canadians
DEAN(E), Joseph, 3739, Rifleman, 'C' Coy, 11th Royal Irish Rifles, aged 35, died of pneumonia while training at Clandeboye, Co. Down on 3rd March 1915 and he is buried in Belfast City Cemetery.  He was born at Balnamore, Ballymoney in 1880, the son of Joseph and Susan Dean.  He enlisted in Randalstown and his wife Annie lived at 15, Daisy Hill, Randalstown.
DORAN, 10024 Private John Philip, 2nd Royal Irish Fusiliers, died on 7th December 1915 and is buried in Salonika (Lembet Road) Cemetery. He was born on the 1 May 1887 at  Randalstown, the son of James Doran and Esther (Hessie) McAuley, both teachers, of Main Street, Randalstown, Co. Antrim. The couple had married in Randalstown RC Chapel on the 4 August 1880. Philip was apparently a well-known pianist and was at one time employed at Toome Railway Station. He had joined the colours at the start of the war.                                                                                                                                  See Virtual Memorial
DRENNAN, Rifleman Robert, 19470,  11th Royal Irish Rifles, was killed on the Somme on his birthday, the 1st July 1916, and is named on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme.  He was born on the 1 July 1893 at Groggan, Randalstown and was the son of William and Sarah Drennan, Groggan, Randalstown. The parents had married in Ballymena Register Office on the 8 October 1892.  William was from Clonkeen and Sarah Rainey from Groggan.


Private John Dunn, Irish Guards, Ballymena Weekly Telegraph, March 1916

Photograph courtesy of N Henderson

DUNN(e), Private John T, 2272, 1st Irish Guards, aged 28, died 1st November 1914 and is named on the Ypres Memorial [Menin Gate].  The 1st November 1914 was a day of intense fighting, fully detailed in the War Diary, and the final comment on events reads thus: 'The casualties amongst the men for today and yesterday were approximately 44 killed, 205 wounded and 85 missing.'
Dunn was the son of Joseph and Mary Dunn and was the husband of Agnes Dunn, of Main St., Randalstown.
FERGUSON, T/Captain James McKee, was born at Neillsbrook, Randalstown on the 20 June 1886 and was the son of the Rev. James E Ferguson, B.A., a local Presbyterian Minister, and Rachel Ferguson, of Neillsbrook, Randalstown, Co. Antrim; James Ferguson’s wife Rachel was the daughter of James Glover. 
James McKee Ferguson was educated at Ballymena, and Queen's University, Belfast, where he graduated as a doctor in March 1914 (He is remembered on the Queen’s University War Memorial and in the tablet in Ballymena Academy). Thereafter he was appointed Medical Officer in the Union Infirmary, Belfast, and he accepted a temporary commission as lieutenant in the Royal Army Medical Corps on 18th December 1914. He was made a temporary captain after one year's service. He went to France in October 1915, and was designated Medical Officer to the 9th Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers. He was subsequently transferred and became Medical Officer of the 6th Battalion, Connaught Rangers. It was serving with the latter that he was killed in action near St Quentin, Somme on the 22 December 1917.  He was then 31 years old.
The Chaplain sent a letter to the family stating, It was my privilege to live in the mess with him, and, like all the others there, the more I got to know of him the more I liked him. Much as we admire his well-stocked mind, we admired and loved still more his clean, honourable personality. No one of the many - too many- from here, whom we have known and lost, has left a sweeter memory behind him."
Three other brothers served in the forces. Hugh Reynolds McKay Ferguson, born 3 November 1880,  was also a doctor in the Royal Army Medical Corps, and the Presbyterian Church in Ireland Roll of Honour 1914-1919 entry for 1st Randalstown Presbyterian Church states he was serving in West Africa. Charles George Ferguson, born 8 February 1892, and John Hastings Glover Ferguson, born 4 January 1882, served in Canadian units (CEF).

4414 Private William Ferris, 6th Connaught Rangers
photograph courtesy of N Henderson

FERRIS, Private William,  4414, 6th Connaught Rangers, was killed on Sunday, 3rd September 1916, the first day of the assault that led to the capture of Guillemont (3-6 Sept), Somme.
The 47th Brigade, 16th (Irish) Division was initially detached from their Division and allocated the role of Corps Reserve, but the 59th Brigade was so mauled early on that they received a battalion each from the 60th, 61st and 47th Divisions. In fact, the 47th Brigade, 16th (Irish) Division was ultimately substituted for the 20th Division's 60th Brigade, which moved back into Divisional Reserve, and 47th Brigade, acting under orders of the 20th Division, undertook the attack on the northern edge of the village. Mount Street (See map below) became the  the Brigade boundary between 59th and 47th Brigades.
The men were ready at 5.00 am and at 8.00 am the artillery barrage began. The War Diary records that some of the heavy trench mortar shells fell short and landed in Rim Trench and Hun Alley and the support trench; casualties resulted. Indeed the diary says that 'up to 12 noon our casualties numbered nearly 200', and that the two assaulting Companies 'were so weakened' that the Commanding Officer 'ordered the Companies forming the 2nd and 3rd waves to reinforce the 1st wave in their assembly trenches. At 12 noon our RFA opened and intense barrage on the enemy's front and support trenches ... the barrage lifted and C and D commenced the attack followed by B and A Coys. Very little opposition was met ... on the left ... though they experienced some casualties from MG fire coming from direction of Quarries. Some opposition was experienced on the right ... the 3rd objective [was taken] at 12.55 pm ... the 8th Royal Munster Fusiliers & the 6th Royal Irish Regiment passed through us on their way towards the sunken road, the final objective. About 140 of our men joined in the advance ... and remained with them to the final objective.'
Ferris died amid this fighting. He was born in Randalstown and lived at 53 Silvio Street, Belfast (BWT).


Sketch map from Inglefield's History of the Twentieth (Light) Division illustrating the successful capture of Guillemont by the Division on 3-4 September 1916 (adapted)

FOSTER,  11/3749 Rifleman Allen, 11th Royal Irish Rifles, died of  wounds on 17th March 1916 and he is buried in Mesnil Ridge Cemetery, Somme.
He (recorded as Forster) was born on the 15 July 1889 at Andraid, a townland between Ahoghill and Randalstown. He was the son of John Foster and his wife Roseanna McBride; she was usually referred to as Anne or Annie. The couple had married on the 10 March 1883 in Ballymena Register Office.  He was a widower from Andraid and she said she came from Tamlaght, Drummaul.
They were at Andraid in 1901 and at Cloghogue, somewhat nearer Ahoghill, in 1911. In 1911 they said they had had six children and five were then still alive; Allen was their third child and was then 12.
Allen enlisted in Randalstown. He had married before or during the Great War and was the husband of. M. Foster, Cloghogue/Caddy, Drummaul.
He is commemorated in Presbyterian Church in Ireland Roll of Honour 1914-1919 on the entry for 2nd Randalstown Presbyterian Church.                                                                                                                                                     See Virtual Memorial
FOSTER, 3734 Lance Corporal John Barkley (sometimes Barclay), 11th Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action on the 1st July 1916.
He was born on the 29 March 1888 at Andraid, Drummaul near Randalstown and enlisted in Randalstown. He was the son of William Foster and Elizabeth (Bessie or Betty) Anne Morrison, the couple having married in 1st Ahoghill Presbyterian Church on the 22 November 1875.  William was 23 and from the townland of Clare and his new wife, also 23, was from Andraid.  The family were at Kildrum, Kells in 1901 and William and Bessie recorded five children: Matilda A (17), Agnes E (15), John B (13), Robert (11) and Rosetta (7).  They were at Andraid in 1911. Betty Ann Foster was a 58 year old widow and she listed three family members who were present: John Barclay (sic) was 23, Robert Morrison was 20 and Rosetta was 17.
John Barkley Foster is commemorated on  Thiepval Memorial and in Randalstown Old Presbyterian Church.

FULTON, 412650 Private John, served as John Watt, 2nd Canadian Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment), was killed on the 22nd September 1916. He was reported to be  31 years old, but he was 33 and born on the 21 March 1883.  He was the son of farmer William Fulton, Tamnaderry, Cargin, Randalstown and Jane Watt, Drumbo(e). The couple had married in 2nd Randalstown Presbyterian Church on the 15 March 1872. They were there in 1901 and 1911, and they said in 1911 that they had had 10 children, 9 of whom were still alive at the time of the census. John was a labourer by calling.
John Fulton is buried in 2nd Canadian Cemetery, Sunken Road, Contralmaison.

GALLOWAY, (sometimes mistakenly Galway, as per CWGC entry) 19510 Rifleman Alexander, 11th Royal Irish Rifles, was 21 when he died of wounds on the 17 June 1916.   We do not know when he was wounded, though the War Diary tells us they 'moved to huts and shelters in Martinsart Wood' on the 14th June. The 11th Battalion were on the 16th June forming 'working parties under RE (Royal Engineers) digging assembly trenches in Thiepval Wood.' This may be when he was injured.
He is buried in Warloy-Baillon Communal Cemetery Extension.  He was born on the 6 April 1894 at Taylorstown, Ballyscullion, near Randalstown.  He was the son of John Galloway, Ballybollen, Ahoghill and Mary Murray, Ballydunmaul, Randalstown. The couple had married in 2nd Randalstown Presbyterian Church on 7 April 1886. They were at Taylorstown, Ballyscullion in 1901, though their first child, Matilda, had been born at Ballybollen, Ahoghill on the 12 November 1887. The three boys, Thomas (8 Dec 1891), Alexander (6 April 1894) and Nathaniel Robert (23 July 1899), were all born at Taylorstown. The family were living at Church Street, Antrim in 1911.
GILMORE, 29168 Private Hugh, 1st Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, died on 21st October 1916 and is named on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme. 
He was born on the 25 August 1893 at Ballynaleney, Randalstown, the son of Patrick Gilmore and Mary McErlain or McErlane, later of Staffordstown, Randalstown. The couple, Patrick from Ballynaleney, Randalstown and Mary from Tullaghbeg, Randalstown, had married in Cargin RC Chapel, Randalstown on the 15 May 1891.                             See Virtual Memorial

GLENDINNING (sometimes Clendenning),  1290 Corporal David, 11th Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action on 1st July 1916.  He was born on the 9 September 1893 at Ballyscullion and was the son of David, Ballygrooby (Ballygruby sic) and Mary Dennison (Denneston sic), Ballygrooby, near Randalstown. The couple had married in St Matthias's Parish Church, Ballyeglish, Co Londonderry on the 13 May 1891.
The 1901 census lists David as age 7, living with the family at house 9 in Ballyriff, Loop, Moneymore. His father was a labourer. David (Sen.) and Mary list their children as: William James, David, Annie, Thomas, and Minnie.
David Glendinning, soldier from Clandeboye Camp, Co Down and who had enlisted in Lisburn, had married Ellen Smyth of Tullygowan, Randalstown in 2nd Randalstown Presbyterian Church on the 19th March 1915. Ellen and his daughter May lived at the time of his death in The Cottage, Ballyronan, Magherafelt. May had been born in Ballyronan on 4th January 1916.
David and Mary Glendinning, had at one time been associated with Duneany, Glarryford. The Ballymena Weekly Telegraph reported David Glendinning of that Glarryford address as being missing in October 1916 and as having died in August 1917.
He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

GUTHRIE,  10425 Lance Corporal George,  2nd King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, died of wounds on the 10th April 1918. He was born at Ballygrooby, Drummaul, Randalstown on the 5 January 1897, the son of RSM Robert Guthrie, Derby Road, Nottingham. 21 year old Lance Corporal Robert Gutherie, King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, then of Victoria Barracks, Belfast, had married Rebecca Scott (22), a servant from 7, Hazelfield Street, Belfast, in St Anne's Parish Church, Belfast on the 10 May 1895. His wife and child later lived at Princes Street, Ballymena. He is buried in Doullens Communal Cemetery, Somme and commemorated on Ballymena War Memorial.                                                          See Virtual Memorial for additional detail.

HAMILL, 17778 Corporal Robert Moore, 12th Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action on the Somme on the 1 July 1916. He is buried in Ancre British Cemetery, Beaumont Hamel, France.
He was said to have been born about 1890 near Randalstown, the son of William John Hamill, and he enlisted in Ballyclare; he was then a labourer in a paper mill and living at Coggrey, Doagh. He named Maggie Hamill, his wife whom he had married on the 22nd October 1909 in Kilbride Parish Church (St Bride's), as his next of kin. He had three children, all boys. Thomas John was born on the 11 August 1911, Robert on the 24 August 1912 and David on the 14 November 1914. All were born at Coggrey (Cogry sic), Doagh.
He is remembered on Ballyclare War Memorial, in Randalstown Royal British Legion Garden of Remembrance, Drummaul Parish Church (Randalstown) and in Kilbride Parish Church.
HAMILL, 584 Rifleman Samuel George, 13th Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action on the 6th July 1916. He was born on the 6 June 1893 at Coolsythe, Drummaul, and he was the son of Margaret Moore and William John Hamill. His birth registration document gives his name as Samuel Givens Hamill. The parents, farmer and widower William John of Aghaboy, Drummaul and Margaret of Caddy, Drummaul, had married on the 8 March 1890 in Drummaul Parish Church, Randalstown. They later lived Legland Street, Ligoniel, Belfast, and William John had died before his son's death. Samuel G Hamill enlisted in Ballymena. He is buried in Doullens Communal Cemetery Extension No 1.
HAMILTON, James, 1293, Corporal, 11th Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action on 10th August 1917. He was aged 20 years. He was born at Duneane near Randalstown and enlisted in Lisburn. He was the son of John Hamilton of Ballymatoskerty, Toomebridge. He is commemorated on the Menin Gate.                                                                          See Virtual Memorial
Military Medal for J C Hamilton, Randalstown

The awarding of the Military Medal for 93681 Lance Corporal John Carson Hamilton, Royal Engineers, is recorded in the Edinburgh Gazette, Issue 13128, 20 August 1917, page 1715.
The 1901 Irish census records the Hamilton family at Cloughogue, Randalstown. David, 60 and a grocer, lived with his wife Margaret, then aged 59.  They listed Annie (35), David (18), Thomas (17) and John C (8).
In 1911 David was 70 and an agricultural labourer, his wife Margaret then said to be 71.  Their daughter Annie was 46.
David and Margaret said that they had been married for 50 years by 1911 and that they had had two children.  It seems that John Carson Hamilton was, as it says in the press cutting, David's grandson. He was by the time he won his medal a resident of 48 Copperfield Street, Belfast. The whole area now has been redeveloped and is known as "Tigers Bay".
HANNAN, 160815 Sapper Daniel Malachy, 33rd Signal Company, Royal Engineers, died on 26th August 1917.  The men were operating in the area where the trenches met the sea, specifically around De Panne and Nieuport, Belgium.
The War Diary has various sections and one such says that on the 26th August 1917 the ‘canal bank [was] heavily shelled and corps lines, and on open lines, but only one line in work to PC Pelican. [refers to telephone lines.] Back shelling near Oost-Dunkirk. Back lines open again. During afternoon 19th Brigade HQ … shelled … Dugout with 4 wireless men was crumpled up by one of the shells – one man escaped bruised, remaining 3 wireless men buried with debris and unable to be got out’. The collapse of the dugout may be the scene of Hannan’s death, though we cannot know for sure.  He is the only man of the 33rd Division Signal Company, Royal Engineers listed by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission as having died on the 26th August 1917.
He was the son of Charles and Mary Hannan, of Main Street, Randalstown and he was born on the 25 November 1896. Publican and farmer Charles Hannan, Randalstown, had married Mary O'Hara of Ballylesson, Ballyclug in Ballymena RC Chapel on the 21 February 1884. He was then 35, his bride 25.  She was his second wife, his first bride, Bridget Duffin, having died aged 27 in 1881.
The family appear in the 1901 census at Main Street, Randalstown. Publican Charles was aged 50, his wife Mary 40.  They listed six children present on census day. Ellen (born 1/12/1875) and Maggie (born 23/6/1878) were daughters of Bridget Duffin and farmer Charles. Charles (born 7/12/1884), Patrick (born 28/7/1889), Harriet (born 17/4/1892) and Daniel Malachy (born 25/11/1896) were Mary's children.
The family do not appear in the 1911 record.
Daniel Malachy is buried in Coxyde Military Cemetery, Belgium.
HARDY, A/203741 Rifleman Louis, 1st Platoon, 'A' Company, 18th King's Royal Rifle Corps, formerly 5089 Argyll Sutherland & Highlanders & S/256843 Royal Army Service Corps, aged 29, died a POW on 28th June 1918.  He is buried in Berlin SW Cemetery.  There are no POW records for him but the cover that would have been with them says 'probably missing since March 1918'.
He was born Lewis Hardie (sic), son of Dennis (sic) and Elizabeth Hardy, Maboy, Craigs, Cullybackey on the 17th February 1890. The couple, blacksmith Denis (sic) Hardy, Ballylummin, Ahoghill and Eliza Mulholland, also Ballylummin, had married in Ahoghill RC Chapel on the 14 February 1884.
The family do not appear in the 1901 or 1911 census returns and were recorded by the CWGC as living at 114, North Hanover St., Glasgow.
HENRY,  30697 Private Patrick, 7/8th Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, was killed in action on the 9th October 1917. The Battalion kept a poor diary and there is no entry for the 9th October 1917. It records only that 'enemy trench mortars were extremely active on out right company trench' on the 8th October, and that they were 'relieved ... and moved to Enniskilling Camp, Ervillers' (Ervillers is north of Bapaume) on the 10th October.
He was born on the 10 March 1891 at Drumderg, near Toome. He was the son of James Henry and Mary Mulholland, the couple having married in Magherafelt RC Chapel on the 11 November 1884. Both indicated they were from Cranfield, Randalstown. James and Mary Henry, Brecart, Toome, had the following children by 1901:  Sarah Henry (born 30th January 1887, Randalstown), James Henry (born 1st September 1888, Toome), Patrick Henry (born 10th March 1891, Toome), Mary Henry (born 3rd June 1893, Toome), Annie Henry (born 1st August 1895, Toome), Lizzie Henry (born 16th September 1897, Toome), Bridget Henry (born 27th January 1900, Toome), Rose Henry (born 21st February 1902, Toome), Catherine Henry (born 6th September 1904, died 29th August 1907, Toome), Bernard Henry (born 18th March 1908, Toome). They, listed as Henery, were at Cloghogue, Duneane in 1911 and Patrick's name does not appear on the census listing. He would have been 20 years old and probably already in Scotland - he enlisted in Dumbarton.  His will of 1917 indicates that his possessions should go to his mother at Moneyglass, Toomebridge.
HOUSTON, 19563 Rifleman William, 'C' Coy. 11th Royal Irish Rifles, died as a POW on the 5th August 1917.  His German records reads as follows: 'Sold. Royal Irish Rifles. 11Btl. C Komp. - verst 5.8.17 - Gemeld. v. d. Kmdtr d. Gef. Lag.1 zu Munster/w. nahere angaben fehlen' (Rough translation - 'Private, Royal Irish Rifles, 11th Battalion, 'C' Company, died 5/8/1917 - Death notified by the Command POW Camp 1, Munster. No further details'
He was the son of Stewart and Agnes Houston, Feehogue, Randalstown and had been born at Taylorstown, Grange on the 10 July 1894.  Farmer Stewart Huston (sic) had married Agnes Fletcher, Clonkeen in Grange Presbyterian Church on the 11 July 1884. The couple had had nine children by 1911 and seven were alive at the time of the census.  Stewart was then a linen factory worker and the family lived at Feehogue, Randalstown. William is buried in Cologne Southern Cemetery, Germany.
JAMISON, William Andrew, 10/676, Private, Wellington Infantry Regiment, New Zealand Expeditionery Force, was killed in action on the 8th August 1915 and is buried in Chunuk Bair (NZ) Cemetery, Gallipoli.  He had embarked on the 16th October 1914.  He was single, the 23 year old son of James (dec'd) and Matilda Jamison, Ballely (also Ballealy), Randalstown.  He gave his address on enlistment as Gordon Road, Toko, NZ. 
William Andrew Jamison was born on the 5 August 1892 at Ballealy, Randalstown.  His parents, James of Ballealy and Matilda Hall of Gortaheran, had married in Randalstown's Drummaul Parish Church on the 15 November 1886.
He is commemorated in Randalstown Old Congregation Presbyterian Church.
KENNEY (or Kenny),  9722 Private Hugh, 2nd Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders, was killed in action on 26th August 1914.
He was born on the 28 April 1886 and was the son of Robert Kenny, Drumanaway, Randalstown and Jane McKenna, Groggan, Randalstown. The couple had married on the 1 October 1872 in Ballymena Register Office.
Hugh is commemorated on La Ferte Sous Jouarre Memorial, France.                                                    See Virtual Memorial
Military Medal

At the time of the 1911 Irish census Edward Kidd, an agricultural labourer and an Anglican, and his wife Margaret, both 28, lived at Ballygrooby, Randalstown.  They said they had then been married for eleven years and that six children born of the marriage were still alive.  They listed James (9), Matilda (7), John (5), Edward (4), Annie Dorothy (3) and David (1). James Jenkin, Edward's 66 year old father in law lived with them.
11/6659 Private Edward Kidd's Military Medal is recorded in the Edinburgh Gazette, Issue 13022, December 12, 1916, page 2288.
Edward Kidd survived the war.

The photograph is from the Larne Times, November 1916
Photograph courtesy of N Henderson

KING, James,  2894, Lance Corporal, 7th Gordon Highlanders, 7th Gordon Highlanders, died on 8th June 1916. He was from Randalstown, Co. Antrim and he is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, France.

The Larne Times, 19 August 1916, has the above photograph of 2894, Lance Corporal Jim King, Gordon Highlanders, who died on the 8th June 1916, and the caption says that he had prior to the Great War worked at Breda Nurseries and that he came from Randalstown. The Northern Whig of 24 July 1916, a Belfast newspaper, notes "Sergeant Jim Beaton and Corporal Jim King, killed, were formerly in the employment of Mr J. T. Lindsay, Breda Nursery. Deceased who were both serving in the Gordon Highlanders, enlisted shortly after the outbreak of war. Beaton was a native of Banchory, Scotland (2789 James Beaton, 1/7 Gordon Highlanders, was indeed killed on 6 July 1916 and he had been born in Banchory.) and King belonged to Randalstown."

The 1911 Irish census records James Beaton, gardener, aged 20 and born in Scotland and James King, a gardener and aged 18, born in County Antrim, living with two other gardeners in a cottage at Breda, Knockbreda, Ballybrogan, County Down. It would appear that James Beaton, probably senior gardener, enlisted in the 7th Gordon Highlanders and James King followed his example.
KNOX, 19593 Rifleman Frank, 11th Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action on the Somme on the 1st July 1916 and is named on the Thiepval Memorial.
CWGC says he was the son of Eliza Jane Knox, Ballygrooby, Randalstown, though his will of 1915 said her address was c/o Mrs C French, New Street, Randalstown.


Private Henry (Harry) Linton,  Royal Irish Rifles

Photograph from Ballymena Observer, Oct 1916 & courtesy of N Henderson

LINTON, 6468 Rifleman Henry, 'C' Company, 11th Royal Irish Rifles [CWGC says 16th RIR, but grave registration shows 11th RIR], died of wounds while a prisoner of war on 14th July 1916.  He was originally buried in St Quentin by the Germans but is now buried in St. Souplet British Cemetery. German POW records say of Linton as follows:  'Private, 11th Royal Irish Rifles, 'C' Company, died 14/7/16 in camp hospital at POW 2 Camp, VII Rue Vauban, St Quentin.' [Another German record - 'Pte. 11Btl. Royal Irish Rifles. C Comp. verst 14.7.16 im krgs. Laz. 2 VII Gef. Laz. zu St Quentin. Daselbst beerd: Friedhof [Buried same place: Cemetery]. They also marked his record 'bauchgegend' or 'abdominal region', thus indicated that he was taken when wounded and telling us where the wound was located.
Henry Linton was born on the 6 February 1885 at Magheralane, Drummaul and was the son of Robert and Mary Jane Linton.  Twenty-five year old labourer Robert Linton (Lynton sic) had married Mary Jane Bell (18) of Magherabeg, Randalstown in Randalstown's Drummaul Parish Church on the 14 May 1877.
The family appear on the 1901 census return and were living at Shane's Castle, Randalstown. Robert was said to be 50, his wife 41.  They listed William (20), Robert (18), Henry (16), Samuel (14), Thomas (8), John (6) and Margaret (3). Widow Mary Jane Bell (70), Robert's mother in law, lived with them.
LINTON, 829281 Private Robert, 8th Bn. Canadian Infantry (Manitoba Regiment), supposedly age 36 and born September 16, 1883, was killed in action on April 28, 1917 while taking part in an 'attack east of Willerval to the west of Arleux-en-Gohelle'. He is remembered on the Vimy Memorial, Pas de Calais, France. 
Robert Linton, brother of Henry (Harry - see above), though living in Winnipeg, was actually born at Drumanaway, Drummaul, Randalstown on the 18 September 1882 and he was the son of Robert Linton and Mary Jane Bell. He enlisted in Canada in the 144th Overseas Battalion, arrived in Liverpool aboard the SS Olympic on the 25 September 1917 and was posted at Seaford Camp to the 8th Battalion for service in France and Flanders.  He was with his unit in the field on the 20 February 1917 and was then killed on the 28 April 1917, a short military career.
His War Service Gratuity was recorded as  being for Mrs. Mary Jane Linton, of Ballygrooby, Randalstown, Ireland.
LYTTLE, 101316 Gunner Arthur enlisted in the 66th Battalion, Canadian Infantry at Edmonton on the 30 September 1915 and was later to serve with the 2nd Brigade, Canadian Garrison Artillery. He was born on the 13 April 1881.  He indicated that he had previously served in the Royal Irish Constabulary, that he a native of Randalstown, and he nominated his sister Catherine Lyttle, Randalstown as his next of kin. Birth records indicate that he was the son of John Lyttle, a railway labourer, and Margaret, nee Allen, of Ballylurgan, Drummaul. Catherine was an older sister and born on the 12 June 1873. Lyttle was returned to Canada and discharged from the army at Edmonton on the 11 July 1919.
MAGEE, 10316 Private Joseph, 2nd Royal Dublin Fusiliers, a regular soldier, died on the 27th August 1914 at the Battle of Le Cateau during the Retreat from Mons, and he was amongst the first local British troops killed in the Great War.
His unit, formerly at Gravesend, left Harrow on the 22nd August, reaching Southampton between 7-8 pm. There they boarded SS Caledonia and went to Boulogne, reaching it after 9.00 pm. The troops remained aboard overnight.
They left Boulogne on the 24th at 12.15 am and were soon at Le Cateau, from which they marched to Beaumont, then to just south of St Python. Four hours later they heard ‘gunfire in the distance’; they ‘moved east & took up position north of Fontaine a Tertre Farm’ and at 6.00 pm they were ‘shelled from NE.’ They met the enemy at 9.00 pm, shooting ‘two uhlans seen in front of line.’ Thereafter they marched to Haucourt, part of the 4th Division on the left of the British line, and angled themselves to form a guard for the left flank of the units fighting further to the east.
One hour and fifteen minutes after arrival and at 6.15 am the ‘enemy opened fire from north.’ At 12.30 pm they received ‘verbal order to hold on at all costs.’ They did so but shelling was encountered from 2.00 pm and they sought orders from 4th Division at 5.00 pm. They were told ‘that all the guns were being withdrawn and that nothing was known of Battalion, and that it had better retire.’ In doing so the Battalion became split up – Headquarters went to Le Catelet, escorting some guns en route.
On the 27th a remnant ‘marched to Roisel, position taken up east of town with Seaforths on our left.’  Such was the chaos that ‘the Brigade consisted of a Staff Captain, about two Coys Seaforths & 100 Dublins.’ They withdrew again at 12 noon and then again at 7 pm, ‘the men put in carts and proceeded to Voyennes.’ They were there on the 28th August, though Magee was already dead.
The diary says that on the 28th August ‘the Battalion had been marching & fighting for four days with practically no rest. The men were completely exhausted & badly in want of sleep. Many of them fell asleep when marching.’
This had taken a toll in other ways. A marginal note relating to the 25th/26th August says that ‘owing to two nights strenuous work men were extremely tired and many of them discarded part of their equipment on coming under fire.’ Moreover, it records that ‘great confusion was caused by men being put in carts. The Battalion was split up into small parties and many men lost their equipment through putting it on different carts from those they rode in. This also gave men the idea that whenever they fell out they would be brought along on conveyances.’
The retreat continued thereafter, but the ‘Battle of Harcourt’ alone, so-called in Appendix 1 in the War Diary, had severe consequences. It says, ‘The Battalion had 16 men wounded & 16 taken prisoners’ by the 26th August and ‘531 men were missing after this battle & up to the present date it is not known what happened to them or what casualties they suffered.’
Magee, born in Randalstown, has no known grave and is remembered on La Ferte-Sous-Jouarre Memorial.
MAGILL, 6205 Rifleman Robert Dobbin, 11th Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action on the 1st July 1916. He was born on the 21 April 1898 at Galgorm Parks, Ballymena and was the son of Robert Magill and Elizabeth Dobbin. Labourer Robert Magill and Lizzie Dobbin, both Galgorm Parks, had married in 1st Ballymena Presbyterian Church on the 25 December 1895. They later lived in Randalstown. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and in Randalstown OC (Old Congregation) Presbyterian Church. CWGC says he was the son of Robert and Elizabeth (Lizzie) Magill, of Craig, Co. Antrim - the 1911 Census says Ballytresna, Drumanaway, Co. Antrim.                                                                                                   See Virtual Memorial
MAWHINNEY,  289182 Petty Officer Stoker William, HMS Gaillardia, was killed in action when his ship hit a mine off the Orkneys during the night of the 22nd - 23rd March 1918.  He had  20 years' service, having enlisted as boy sailor.
William Mawhinney was born on the 12 February 1878 at Ballymena and he was the son of Samuel Mawhinney and Jane McMeekin.  The couple had had six children by 1911 and all were then alive. They were living at Edenvale, Shilvodan, near Randalstown in 1901 and 1911.  His stated next of kin was Mr. Thomas McKeen, Bryan Street, Ballymena. He is named Chatham Naval Memorial.

Private Hector McAndrew, Royal Irish Rifles

The caption on this contemporary photograph is wrong. The image is of Hector McAndrew. John McAndrew was his father. He was a 42 year old Scotman and textile worker, and he was living at Ballygrooby, Randalstown at the time of the 1911 Irish census with his 38 year old wife of twenty years wife called Sarah.  The couple had had five children and the four still alive, all born in Scotland, were named as Catherine Grey (19), Jane (17), Hector (13) and Sarah Johnston (10).
Local press photograph courtesy of N Henderson

McANDREW, Hector, 3738, Rifleman, 'C' Coy. 11th Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action on the 3rd March 1916, possibly shot by a sentry.  He was aged 18, the son of John and Sarah McAndrew, Glasgow, Scotland, though he appears to have been living in the Ballygrooby area, Randalstown, Co Antrim just before the war.  He is named in Randalstown Old Congregation records and the family of John & Sarah McAndrew, Ballygrooby, Randalstown appear in the 1911 Census.  He is buried in Mesnil Ridge Cemetery, Mesnil-Martinsart, France.                                                              See Virtual Memorial for fuller interesting account.

Private William John McAuley, 9th Royal Irish Fusiliers
Photograph courtesy of N Henderson and Ballymena Weekly Telegraph

McAULEY, Private William John, 41556, 9th Royal Irish Fusiliers, died on 11th April 1918 and is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium.  He was the son of John and Mary McAuley, of Tamlaght, Randalstown, Co. Antrim.
Farmer John Johnston McAuley of Tamlaght, Randalstown married Mary Morrison of Andraid, Randalstown in Antrim's 1st Presbyterian Church on the 29 June 1886. The couple were to have at least five children before Mary died of heart failure at Tamlaght and aged 50 on the 22 September 1904.
The family appears on the 1901 and 1911 census record but confusion is caused by discrepancy between names recorded on census documents and those of birth registration. Lizzie was born on the 12 August 1886, Agnes on the 15 February 1888, Sarah on the 2 July 1889, all Andraid, Drummaul, William John (recorded as William Hugh) at Coolsythe on the 1 February 1893, and Robert at Andraid on the 24 April 1894; on both census returns Robert is recorded as Hugh! In 1911 Mary is recorded as Agnes.
William John McAuley's Medal Index Card shows that he initially enlisted in the North Irish Horse, service number 1759, and he was therefore one of the men from that unit transferred to the 9th Royal Irish Fusiliers in the reorganisation of resources. He then became 41556.
Author Phillip Tardif says in The North Irish Horse in the Great War that McAuley was wounded at the railway station in  Poperinghe, sustaining shrapnel damage to his right buttock and left thigh, and that he subsequently died at No 10 Casualty Clearing Station at St Remy siding.
McBRIDE, 11/19633 Rifleman Thomas, 11th Royal Irish Rifles, died of wounds on the 4th April 1916. He was born on the 15 July 1889 at Kilknock, Drummaul and lived in lived at Muckrim.  He was the son of farmer and widower John McBride, Muckrim, Duneane and Ellen Nicholl, Kilknock, Drummaul, two townlands close to Randalstown.  The pair had married in 2nd Ahoghill Presbyterian Church (Trinity) on the 19 January 1889. 
He is buried St. Sever Cemetery, Rouen and commemorated in Grange Presbyterian Church and commemorated in Grange Presbyterian Church.                                                                                                                               See Virtual Memorial
McCAUGHEY, 2498648 William enlisted in the CEF on the 24 September 1917.  He said his father was James McCauley and gave his address as 13, Fountainwell Street, Springburn, Glasgow, but he said he himself was born at Randalstown, Co. Antrim on the 2 November 1887; local records show he was born at Tamlaght, Randalstown on the 2 November 1888, the son of James and Elizabeth McCauley, nee Herbison.
See Ballymena Canadians entry.
McCLURE, Lieutenant Hugh Cecil, 146th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery, died aged 22 years died on 23rd October 1918.  He is buried in Le Cateau Communal Cemetery. He was the son of the Rev. Dr. J. J. & Mary McClure, Duneane, Randalstown.
146th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery was subject to reorganisation, becoming part of the 47th Heavy Artillery Group and being mobilized as such on 28th March 1916, though old designations were often used as well. It was redesignated the 47th Heavy Artillery Brigade, Royal Garrison Artillery on the 18th December 1917.
The War Diary for the 47th Heavy Artillery Group/Brigade says that on the 21st October 1918 the 146th and 309th Siege Batteries 'move east of Le Cateau.' and the next entry, that of the 23rd October, reads as follows: 'Attack on a front of several armies - XIII Corps take practically all objectives. Lt McClure and a signaller were killed by machine gun fire when reconnoitring road to Pommeruil'. (sometimes Pommeroeul & Pommereail). The other soldier killed was 161557 Gunner W E (William) Cross.
Presbyterian minister John James McClure, son of Presbyterian minister Samuel, married Mary Denham of Clover Hill, Randalstown, daughter of Presbyterian minister William, in Antrim Town’s 1st Presbyterian Church on the 15th September 1884. The couple had at least four children who served in the Great War.
William Denham McClure was born on the 19 October 1887 at Drumcullen, Duneane. He became a Presbyterian minister and served in the Great War as a chaplain and held the rank of Captain.
Samuel McClure was born on the 2nd April 1890 at Drumcullen and became a Major, eventually serving in the Royal Air Force after its creation.
John Richard Smyth McClure was born at Drumcullen, Duneane on the 10 November 1892, not in South Africa as sometimes stated. He died during the war – see below.
Hugh Cecil McClure was born at Drumcullen on the 4th August 1896. He too, as stated above, was to die in the Great War.
The McClure family had links with South Africa, the CWGC material relating to their son's headstone reading: 'Rev. Dr. McClure, Capetown. Mrs M McClure, Millsite, Randfontein Estates, Transvaal, South Africa'.

McCLURE, John Richard Smythe (sic), Royal Engineers, died on the 29th October 1918 and aged 26 years. He was the son of the Rev. Dr. John James McClure and Mary McClure – see above.
He was educated at Capetown and Johannesburg, gained a BSc, and later served in South Africa and in German South-West Africa with the Transvaal Light Horse. This South African connection is explained on page 12 of a little volume, The McClure Family, by James Alexander McClure, Presses of Frank A. Owen, Petersburg, Virginia, 1914, that is available on the Internet. It reads, 'Rev. John J. McClure, D.D., of Capetown, South Africa, writes September 9, 1913: "My father, Rev. Samuel McClure, who ministered at Crossroads, near Londonderry, and who died in 1874, came from Dervock (Dernock sic), near Ballymoney, Co. Antrim, where his forefathers had been for some generations. They came originally from some place in the southwest of Scotland."  The boys' parents had clearly moved to South Africa at some point before the Great War.
John Richard Smyth McClure returned to England in 1915, and joined Royal Engineers, being gazetted a Temporary Second Lieutenant on the 17 October that year. He served with BEF in France, was gazetted Acting Captain on the 14 November 1917 and served in the 250th Tunnelling Company. This company was involved in the mining of Messines Ridge in June 1917.
He was twice wounded and on the second occasion was sent to hospital in London. He was discharged, but then died of influenza at 23 Netherhall Gardens.
His name is not found on the local memorial, Church Row War Memorial. He was mentioned in despatches.
McCORMICK, 20909 Private Thomas, 1st Royal Irish Fusiliers, was killed in action on the 24th March 1918. He had been born 20 October 1895 at Drummaul, Randalstown and was the son of John McCormick (McCormack on 1901 census return) and Sarah Campbell. Labourer and farmer's son John from Artresnahan, Randalstown had married Sarah in Randalstown RC Chapel on the 26 October 1893. The couple and their four children were living at Shane Street, Randalstown in 1901 and were at Ballygrooby, Randalstown in 1911.  The pair said at the latter date that they had had eight children and that seven were alive in 1911.  They listed Thomas (15), Catherine/Katie (14), Margaret/Maggie (12), James (9) Jane (8), John (6) and Elizabeth (4). The parents and the two eldest children were then employed in the textile industry and it may have been for that reason that they moved to Ballymena sometime after the 1911 census. They were living at Railway Street Place, Harryville at the time their son was killed. Thomas is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial, Somme.                                              See Virtual Memorial
McCRORY, 7501 Serjeant William, 2nd Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action on the 25th September 1915. He was born on the 15 April 1892 at Tamnaderry, Duneane, Randalstown and he enlisted in Belfast. He was the eldest son of William John McCrory, Ballycloghan, Duneane and Elizabeth (Lizzie) Hutchinson, Staffordstown, Randalstown.  The couple had married in 1st Antrim Presbyterian Church on the 27 November 1889. They had had eleven children by 1911 and all were then alive. He is commemorated on the Ypres Memorial (Menin Gate), Belgium.                                                            See Virtual Memorial
McDONNELL, 222 Sapper John, Canadian Engineers, was living in Ottawa at the time of his enlistment on the 20 January 1915 and the 6’ tall single RC said he was a civil servant, and he named his father as his next of kin. He was Frank McDonnell, 106, Marlborough Ave, Ottawa. He gave 84, Marlborough Ave, Ottawa as his address at demobilisation.
                                                                                                                                                                           See Ballymena Canadians entry.
McDOWELL, 2379918  Lance Corporal William was drafted under the terms of the Military Service Act, 1917.  He was a single man, a Presbyterian farmer, living in Nesbitt, Manitoba. He said his father was Samuel McDowell, his mother Jane, and that they lived at Feehogue, Randalstown, the place where he had been born on the 17 March 1890.
See Ballymena Canadians entry.
McGROGGAN, 25253 Sapper Patrick Joseph, 77th Field Company, Royal Engineers, died on 22nd September 1918. The War Diary of the unit says that from the 19th - 24th September 1918 they were 'consolidating in front of Gouzeaucourt'.
He was born in Randalstown and is buried in Fins New Brit Cemetery, Sorel Le Grand, Somme.
McGUIGAN, 43172 Private James, 8th Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, formerly 6275 Connaught Rangers, died on 9th September 1916. 
On the 8th September 49th Brigade received orders 'for the attack on Ginchy & ground SE of it, the Brigade being detailed for Divisional Reserve.' 8th Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers were 'to occupy new trenches at NE corner of Guillemont.' They were at Bernafay Wood on the 9th September, the War Diary stating that 'the Brigade was relieved by the 3rd Guards Brigade on the night of the 9th, early morning of the 10th.' Thereafter they were at 'Billion Farm.'
On the 9th September the 8th Inniskillings had been put 'at disposal of the 48th Infantry Brigade', and were to 'follow in close support of the 8th Dublin Fusiliers, in their advance on the 2nd objective'. This they did, getting 'into positions right of Ginchy', according to 2nd Lt. Brewster, later killed.
They were active again later, the Report on Operation Carried out on the 9th September 1916 reporting that the 8th Dublins later lost direction 'and on advancing to the final objective around 5.30 pm', the 8th Inniskillings found 'the line was occupied by Germans. On advancing enemy showed white flags but we rushed his trench causing him many casualties, and taking about 30 prisoners.' Somewhere in all this James McGuigan was killed.
He came from Duneane, Randalstown and is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme.
McNALLY, 4609 Private Charles, 6th Connaught Rangers, died on the 18th July 1916. The unit, previously at Noeux-Les-Mines, moved to trenches near 14 Bis, close to Loos, on the 15th July. There was quite a lot of low intensity use of artillery, mortars, machines guns, etc by both sides but insignificant damage. The War Diary entry for the 18th July says only, 'intermittent  shelling all day doing little damage. We were very active with rifle grenades ... enemy's retaliation feeble'. It does say that Lt H R Miles was killed on the 18th July by a shell; CWGC says 2nd Lt Henry Robert Miles was killed on the 16th July 1916. 
Charles McNally was born on the 13 July 1879 at Drumsough, Randalstown and he was the son of Hugh McNally and Sarah McLarnon, Randalstown. He is buried in Bethune Town Cemetery.
McVEIGH, 4753 Private John, 1st Connaught Rangers, died on the 22nd October 1916 and is buried in Basra War Cemetery, Iraq. He was born on the 1 November 1893 in Randalstown and he was the son of James McVeigh and Catherine (Kate) O'Hara, Ballygrooby, Randalstown, Co Antrim. The couple had married in Randalstown RC Chapel on the 3 October 1891. He was living in the family home at Ballygrooby in 1901 and 1911. In 1901 James was 31, Catherine (30). They listed John (7), Patrick (6), Alexander (4), Joseph (2) and infant Catherine. In 1911 James (19) and Jane (9) were new children named. The parents said in 1911 that they had had seven children and one had died - Joseph had died on the 2 April 2005 at the age of six. John was the brother of 3667 Patrick McVeigh (below).                                                                                                     See Virtual Memorial
McVEIGH, 3667 Private Patrick, 1st Bn, Royal Irish Fusiliers, died as a POW on 14th June 1918.  He is buried in Berlin South West Cemetery.  He was born on the 19 November 1894 at Ballygrooby, Randalstown and he was the son of James McVeigh and Catherine O'Hara, Ballygrooby, Randalstown. He was the brother of John (above)                                      See Virtual Memorial
MILLAR, 1474 Lance Corporal David George, 12th Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action on the 15th April 1918.  He was born on the 31 May 1899 at Shane's Castle Park, Randalstown and he was the son of shepherd William Millar and Catherine (sometimes Kathleen) Whittlet, both born in Perthshire, Scotland. The family were at Shane's Castle Park in 1901 and 1911, and at the latter date William and Catherine said they had been married for 29 years. They had had nine children and eight were still alive in 1911. They later lived at Bailey Cottage, Randalstown. He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

MILLAR, 6862 Rifleman Thomas, 12th Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action on the 1st July 1916.  He was born on the 27 August 1898 at Drumanaway, Drummaul, Randalstown and was the only son of James and Sarah Millar. Labourer James Millar, Groggan, had married Sarah Stewart, domestic servant in Drummaul Parish Church manse, in Drummaul Parish Church on the 22 November 1897.

Sarah Millar was living at Aghaboy, Drumanaway with Thomas (55) and Mary (54) Stewart, presumably her parents. She was 31 and her son Thomas (2) was with her on census day.

Thomas (77) and Mary (72) Stewart were at Caddy, Drummaul in 1901. Sarah (41) lived with them and she listed her daughters, Elizabeth (8) and Mary Agnes (4). She also said she and her husband had had four children and three were still alive on census day.  Thomas (12) was a visitor in the household of the Reverend Joseph McKinstry. He was presumably visiting the minister's domestic servant, Mary Agnes Stewart (32), also listed.

Thomas enlisted in Clandeboye. He is commemorated in Randalstown OC (Old Congregation) Presbyterian Church and on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme

MOORE, 221 Rifleman Hugh, 11th Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action on the 1st July 1916 on the Somme and is buried in the AIF Burial Ground, Flers.  He was the son of farmer Henry Moore and Martha O'Neill, of Maghereagh, Randalstown. The family are recorded at Maghereagh in 1901 and 1911.
In 1901 Henry (60) and Martha (40) listed Harry (5), James (3) and Hugh (1).
In 1911 the couple said they had been married for sixteen years and that they had had six children. They were all alive at the time of the census. They listed themselves, 69 and 44 respectively, and Henry (15), Mary Jane (14 - 2/12/1896 at Maghereagh), Hugh (11 - born 1/1/1900 at Maghereagh), Catherine (8 - born 11/5/02 at Maghereagh) and Elizabeth (6 - 29/1/05 at Maghereagh). James (born 26/7/98 at Ballygrooby) was not present in 1911, and no record of Harry's birth can be found.

MOORE, 7295 Corporal William Alfred, 'A' Company, 11th Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action on the 10th July 1916.
He was born on the 1 April 1898 at Randalstown and he was the son of Joseph Moore and Elizabeth (Lizzie) Sheridan. The couple were living at Main Street, Randalstown in 1901. Joseph, 47 and in 'charge of bleach works' and Lizzie (41) listed three children, Joseph Henry (4 - but actually born 22 January 1894 and recorded as 'unknown' child of Joseph Moore and Elizabeth Sheridan), William Alfred (3) and Susan Elizabeth (infant - born 10 July 1900 at Randalstown). The family do not appear in the 1911 census record.
William Alfred Moore is buried in St. Soulet British Cemetery, Nord, France.    See Virtual Memorial for fuller account

Distinguished Conduct Medal for 4744 Regimental Sergeant Major, P Mulholland, Royal Irish Rifles and Randalstown
Edinburgh Gazette, Issue 13120, July 30th, 1917, page 1552
O'KANE, Private Francis, S/3488, served with the 8th Seaforth Highlanders and was killed on 27th August 1917.  The unit marched out from Ypres via the Menin Gate to the Poijze Road and met a guide to take them to the place where they were to 'relieve the 10th Scottish Rifles ... in Right Front Sector'. The relief was complete by early on the 27th August. A generally quiet day was interrupted by some shelling from 2 pm to 9 pm, though no casualties are mentioned.
He was a native of Randalstown and is remembered on the Tyne Cot Memorial.
O'NEILL, Arthur Edward Bruce, Captain, 2nd Life Guards, was killed in action on the 4th November 1914. He was aged 38, born 19 September 1876, and was the 2nd son of Baron O'Neill of Shane's Castle, Randalstown and his wife Louisa Katherine Emma. He had married Annabel Crewe-Milnes on the 21 January 1902 at St Paul's Church, Knightsbridge, London. He was the MP for Mid-Antrim and was the first MP to die in the war. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Ypres Memorial (Menin Gate), Belgium.
Captain A E B O'Neill was the father of Captain Terence Marne O'Neill, later PM of Northern Ireland. He lived at Glebe, Ahoghill.                                                                                                              See Weekly War 1914 for full account
O'NEILL, Private Bernard, 4966, 1st Irish Guards, died on 31st March 1918.  The 1st Irish Guards were east of Arras, operating around the Boiry St Martin and Boisleux au Mont. The War Diary says only as follows: 'Quiet day. Nothing of importance occurred.' He may have been wounded earlier. On the 30th March the Germans laid 'a very heavy barrage ...on our front line and Battalion HQ ... causing many casualties.'
He was born in Randalstown and remembered on the Arras Memorial, France.
O'NEILL, 679280 Private James, 2nd Canadian Pioneers, was born on the 15 March 1885 and was the son of Hugh and Sarah Agnes O'Neill of Tamlaght, Drummaul, Randalstown.Hugh O'Neill of Tamlaght had married Sarah Agnes Rainey of Caddy, Drummaul in Randalstown OC Church on the 9 August 1880.
James O'Neill lived at Ossington Avenue, Toronto with his wife Margaret Ann O'Neill. They had two children in 1916; Mary Ann was aged 5 and Sarah Agnes was aged 2.
James O'Neill sustained shrapnel wounds to his legs while serving at Hill 70 on the 26 August 1917 and was to remain in various hospitals and convalescent units until finally discharged on the 11 January 1918.  He continued to have a 'bad left leg' and was soon deemed medically unfit and returned to Canada aboard the SS Corsican from Liverpool.  He received further treatment in Canada and was not discharged from the CEF until 20 April 1918.
James O'Neill died in Canada on the 27 April 1950.
Randalstown Military Cross - Captain Samuel Ernest Picken, RAMC
Samuel Ernest Picken, born at Ballytresna on the 29 August 1890,  was the son of James and Anna Picken (nee Craig) and the family appear in the 1901 Irish census, their home being in 'Hazelbank', Ballytresna, Randalstown.  James was 52 and a GP but he had also trained as a surgeon, though he didn't practice.  The couple listed three children: Andrew was 15, James Craig was 12 and Samuel Ernest was 10.  Martha Holden, a sister, and three servants lived with them.
The family were at 7 Richmond Crescent, Antrim Road, Duncairn, Belfast by the time of the 1911 census.  Anna Craig Picken was a widow - James had died on the 9 June 1902 at Ballytresna - and she listed three children: Andrew was 25 and a 'student of chemical teacher', James was 23 and an apprentice in the linen business and Samuel Ernest was a medical student. The family had one servant.
Dr Picken survived the war.

Citation in London Gazette, 17 September 1917, Issue 30287, page 9581
OSBORNE, 2248 Lance Corporal William, 11th Royal Irish Rifles, was born on the 12 March 1887 and was the illegitimate son of Martha Osborne, Tannaghmore, Drummaul.  He appears in the 1901 Irish census as a 14 year old farm servant employed by farmer Hugh Wilkinson and family at Tannaghmore.
William Osborne was killed in action on the 16 August 1917, the first day of the Battle of Langemarck, a phase of the Battle of Passchendaele (3rd Ypres) and he is remembered on the Tyne Cot Memorial. He is named on the Congregational Roll of Honour for 2nd Randalstown Presbyterian Church.
POLLARD, 12195 Private Patrick, 1st Royal Irish Fusiliers, died on 11th April 1917.  He was born in Randalstown and is buried in Brown's Copse Cemetery, Roeux, Pas de Calais.
The unit were attacking German positions 'east of Fampoux', near Arras. The War Diary says 'the Seaforth Highlanders and the Royal Irish Fusiliers came under machine gun fire ... on the way into assembly position', but they attacked as scheduled, the two regiments leading the attack in two waves in their sector. The attack had mixed results overall, the Germans putting up a strong fight, but the diary notes that 'the Royal Irish Fusiliers and the Seaforth Highlanders succeeded in reaching their objectives.' During the day, however, Patrick Pollard was killed.
The 1911 census return records labourer Patrick Pollard living at Sultan Street, Belfast with his wife Susan and two children, Mary Jane (2) and infant John. He had married on the 10 May 1908 in St Paul's RC Church, Belfast,  He was then living at 19, Dunlewey Street and his bride Susan Givens was living at 11, Waterford Street, Belfast. He gave his father's name as John Pollard.  The 1911 census records widower John Pollard (63), a linen weaver, living as a boarder with the Diamond family at Lisnagreggan, Drummaul, Randalstown.
Photograph courtesy of N Henderson
POLLARD, Private Thomas, 6733, 1st Royal Irish Fusiliers, died on 18th October 1914.  They were in the area around Armentieres and the River Lys and were assisting other elements of 10th Infantry Brigade resist the German onslaught. They had moved northeast of the town and the War Diary says that on the 18th October the Battalion was 'standing by all day ... The Battalion was placed at the disposal of the O. C. 2nd Seaforth Highlanders and remained in the trenches which had been made and occupied the previous night.' The 2nd Seaforth Highlanders' War Diary says the Seaforths had orders to 'take the town of Frelinghien' and had moved up to Houplines earlier to facilitate this. They said the Royal Irish Fusiliers 'had taken up a position running from the main road at Le Ruage southeastwards.' The Germans were in a line south of Frelinghien, and it was in this general area that Pollard died.
He was born in Randalstown and is remembered on Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium.
POLLOCK, 11/16942 Rifleman Alexander, 11th Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action on the Somme on the 1st July 1916. He was born at Tamlaght on the 8 November 1891, the son of weaver William Pollock and his wife Mary Jane McMullen or McMullan.
Alexander, son of Hugh Pollock, and Mary Jane McMullan, daughter of Alexander, both from Andraid, Drummaul, had married in Wellington Street Presbyterian Church, Ballymena on the 31 October 1885.
The family was at Andraid, Randalstown in 1901 and at Caddy, Randalstown in 1911.
Alexander Pollock is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme.
RAINEY, 622046 Private James, had been born on the 8 October 1890, his parents being James and Margaret Rainey of Leitrim, Randalstown. He enlisted on the 22 December 1914 in Winnipeg and served with the 44th and 52nd Battalions, Canadian Infantry.  He was killed in action while serving with the latter in the trenches west of Courcelette on the 17 September 1916. He is one of those remembered on the Vimy Memorial.
See entry in Ballymena Canadians.
RAMSEY, Private James, 9669, 1st Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, died on 21st May 1915 during Gallipoli operations.  He was born in Randalstown and is buried in Twelve Tree Copse Cemetery, Turkey.
ROBB, Lance Corporal Terence, 20908, 8th Royal Irish Fusiliers, died on 4th September 1916.  They were at Casement Trench on the 4th September when at 1 pm they 'received orders to move up in close support of the 95th Infantry Brigade, to be available in case of hostile attack from Leuze Wood' (east of Guillemont, Somme). They were slow getting there, the guide taking them to the wrong place, and 'no sooner was the Battalion in position than the enemy shelled the trenches inflicting between 20 and 30 casualties.' It seems likely that he was killed in the bombardment.
Terence Robb was on the 26 July 1883 at Maghereagh, Drummaul, Randalstown. He was the son of labourer Hugh Robb and his wife Nancy (Agnes) Wilson.
ROBINSON, 101542 William Ross,  served with the 66th and 49th Battalions, Canadian Infantry and with the 2nd Tunnelling Company, Canadian Engineers.  He was born on the 9 March 1894 and registration of birth registers show that he was the son of James Robinson, a farmer of Mossview, Moneynick, Duneane and Catherine Robinson, nee Ross, also of Moneynick, Randalstown. He was a labourer and single when he enlisted on the 22 November 1915 at Edmonton. William Ross Robinson was eventually discharged in London on the 11 July 1919.
See Ballymena Canadians entry.

SAMUELS, Captain Arthur Purefoy Irwin, 11th Royal Irish Rifles, was born in Dublin on 14 February 1887. His father, Arthur Warren Samuels, KC, was a barrister, later MP for Dublin University, Ireland's Solicitor-General and Attorney General, and a judge.
API Samuels was educated at St. Stephen's Green school and Trinity College Dublin, and, the only son of the family, he followed in his father's footsteps and was called to the bar in 1910. Thereafter he joined the North-West Circuit.
In 1911, he was listed in the Irish Census as being a practicing barrister, single, and living with his father and family at Howth Hill, Dublin. However, he married Dorothy Gage Young, of Millmount, Randalstown, Co. Antrim in 1913.
Having held a commission in the Territorial Force, on the outbreak of World War One in 1914, Samuels was commissioned to the 11th Royal Irish Rifles, 36th (Ulster) Division, being gazetted Lieutenant in November 1914, and temporary Captain in February 1915. He was in France and Flanders by October 1915.
He was slightly wounded by shrapnel just before the Somme Offensive began on the 1st July 1916 and invalided out of the line, but Captain Samuels did recover sufficiently to rejoin his battalion that autumn. He was once again injured, this time fatally, at Messines and died on 24 September 1916.
Thanks to Our Heroes, South Dublin Libraries and BBC for factual material
622364 SCOTT, Private Archie (actually Arthur Scott and referred to as such once in his military record) enlisted in the 44th Battalion, CEF at Winnipeg on the 14 May 1915. Arthur was born on the 19 August 1892 at Drummanaway, Drummaul, Randalstown. His parents, labourer Thomas Scott and Ellen Baxter, had married in Ballymena Register Office on the 2 June 1887. They later lived at Aghaboy, Drumanaway, Randalstown.
Archie was wounded by shrapnel while serving with the 27th Battalion and discharged as medically unfit on the 31 January 1918.  See Ballymena Canadians entry.

SCOTT (MM), 202841 Acting Serjeant John, 1/5 Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders, died on 23rd July 1918 and is buried in Raperie British Cemetery, Villemontoire.  CWGC says he was the son of Rose McIlvenna Scott, of 36, Crescent Street, Greenock, and the late John Scott.
John Scott, born Greenock, Scotland and then a moulder, married Rose McIlvenna of Ballytresna, Drummaul, in 2nd Randalstown Presbyterian Church on the 10 January 1885.  Their son John was born at Ballytresna on the 15 March 1888. John was then a scutcher in the linen industry.
John Scott was a plater working in Scott’s Shipyard when he had joined the Territorial Army, 5th Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders, in 1909. He went on active service and rose through the ranks, being appointed sergeant in May 1917. He fought in the Dardanelles Campaign and in France and Flanders, and he won his Military Medal in Palestine. He sustained a gunshot wound to his thigh in November 1917. He was not seriously hurt and returned to his unit within a month and was killed in action on 23 July 1918.
His father died on 9 November 1921.
John's brother, 159803 Gunner William Scott, Royal Garrison Artillery, aged 25 and born in Greenock,  died on 25 February 1919 of illness contracted while on active service. Given his brother's age it is clear that the family had moved to their father's native Greenock shortly after John's birth.

Private John Seymour, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers
Local press photograph courtesy of N Henderson

SEYMOUR, 23735 Private John, 9th Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, said to be 22 years old, died of wounds on 28th March 1918 and is buried in St Saver Cemetery Extension, Rouen, France.  He was born on the 11 January 1895 at Ballytresna, Randalstown and was the son of Robert and Elizabeth Seymour, of Ballytresna, Drummaul, Randalstown. The couple, carpenter Robert Seymour of Ballytresna and Elizabeth Andrews of Aghaboy, Drummaul, had married in 1st Ahoghill Presbyterian Church on the 13 June 1879.
SMYTH, James, 501, Lance Corporal, 11th Royal Irish Rifles, was KIA on the 1st July 1916. He was aged 19 and the son of Thomas and Margaret, Caddy, near Randalstown.  He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial and in the Presbyterian Church in Ireland Roll of Honour 1914-1919 entry for 2nd Randalstown Presbyterian Church.
501 James Smyth and US soldier Thomas Smyth (Below) appear to be brothers. Indeed, James, a stonemason, and his wife Margaret, married for 25 years by the time of the 1911 census and having 12 children, had probably five sons in the forces, this suggested by the Presbyterian Church in Ireland Roll of Honour 1914-1919 entry for 2nd Randalstown Presbyterian Church, though there is some apparent error in the listing of initials. A Smyth (Alexander) served in the Gordon Highlanders and James, mistakenly listed as T Smyth, died while serving in the 11th Royal Irish Rifles. William John, Robert Gibson (incorrectly listed as R J) and Thomas all served with the US Army, Thomas being killed. Alexander, James, William John, Thomas and Robert Gibson Smyth all appear in the listings of the 1901 and 1911 Irish census, though not all on the same one.


SMYTH, Thomas, Private First Class, 361st Infantry, 91st Division, US Army, born 15 August 1892, died on the 9th October 1918.  He is buried in the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery, Romagne, France. He was a native of Caddy, Randalstown and enlisted in Washington, USA.
The 361st was part of the 181st Brigade and was serving with the 1st & 32nd Divisions in the Meuse Argonne. On October 9th the 1st was attacking around Cote 269 and the 181st was supposed to be holding a line from Hill 255 to Cote 269. When it was discovered the Brigade was not occupying this line, they advanced to do so. This was near the Bois du Chene Sec.
The details of the action in which he died on the 9th October are described in the records of the 91st Division:
… the 32nd Division was supposed to be the line from Hill 269 to Hill 255 (an American Army objective formerly reached by the 91st Division, September 29), [but] the elements of the 32nd Division relieved were actually on a line one and one-half kilometres south of the line joining those two crests, both of which were highly organized and defended by machine gun nests.
Some machine gun positions were at the mouths of tunnels opening out of the southern slopes of the hills. A strong concrete blockhouse was discovered just to the north of Hill 255. The defences of both hills flanked the approaches to each other and were protected by well-directed artillery barrage from the north.
General McDonald personally reconnoitred the situation, ... ascertaining that the line he was supposed to hold could only be taken by advancing while the 1st Division attacked on his left and the 32nd on his right, [but] he was then ordered by the Commanding General, 1st Division, to advance, seize and hold the line indicated, at “H" hour, October 9. The 361st Infantry and the 347th Machine Gun Battalion advanced at 9:40 o’clock, October 9, the right assault battalion reaching the base of Hill 255 under heavy artillery and machine gun fire from the two crests north of them. Many casualties were suffered.
At 11 o'clock wounded men from the right flank combat liaison detachment reported that the 125th Infantry (32nd Division), on the right of the 181st Brigade, had not advanced abreast of them. Further advance being impossible the new line was held, the men digging in and waiting until the resistance from Hills 269 and 255 could be reduced by artillery.
Meanwhile Hill 269 was reconnoitred by patrols and was attacked by the 1st Battalion, 361st Infantry. The crest was seized and held at 16 o'clock [1600 hrs]. Under artillery fire protection the 3rd Battalion, 361st Infantry, seized Hill 255, after fighting all afternoon, about 18 o'clock [1800 hrs] and dug in. During the night of October 9-10 the concrete blockhouse on the northern slope of Hill 255 continued to harass the troops.
Extracted from THE STORY OF THE 91st DIVISION, page 44, published San Francisco, 91st Division Publication Committee, San Mateo, California, 1919.
See Virtual Memorial for further details of Thomas Smyth and his brothers.

SPEEDIE, 14572 Sergeant Harry, Royal Canadian Dragoons, died on the 30th March 1918 and is named on the Vimy Memorial.  He was born on the 13 March 1885 at Drummaul, Randalstown, the son of the late Henry Speedie (Speedy sic) and Margaret Speedie, Clover Hill, Randalstown.  Henry of Drummaul and Margaret Thompson of Tamlaght had married in Randalstown OC Presbyterian on the 1 December 1882. Harry is named in the Congregational Roll of Honour for 1st Randalstown Presbyterian Church.  His brothers, T J Speedie of the 12th Royal Irish Rifles & Captain W Speedie of the RAMC, are also listed.  He was nearly 5' 9" tall and had light brown hair and grey eyes.  He was single, one of seven siblings brought up on a farm, and was working in Canada as a commercial salesman at the time of his enlistment on the 24th September 1914.

L-R: Alfie, Thompson, Robert & William Speedie

Sergeant Harry Speedie, Royal Canadian Dragoons, 'B' Squadron was killed on the 30th March at the Battle-of-Moreuil-Wood, as a letter to the family explained -
Sir
Sgt Speedy was killed on 30th March in the wood just North of Castel - East of Amiens after the squadron had charged upon the enemy which resulted in our taking the wood. He fought a ground battle against a number of Germans after his horse had been shot but later on was shot dead. After the infantry took over from us they lost the wood but later the French retook it. He is a great loss to my squadron. My sincerest sympathies in your sad loss.
Yours sincerely
RS Timmis, Major
Thanks to Chris Speedy for the photographs and letter.

The Stewart Brothers
Local press photograph courtesy of N Henderson

STEWART, 7275 Rifleman James, 11th Royal Irish Rifles, aged 18, died on 8th August 1917 and is buried in New Irish Farm Cemetery, Belgium. 
The unit began moving into the line around Plum Farm (NE of Ypres), which was being shelled as they arrived, on the evening of the 7th August and the relief was completed at 3.40 am on the 8th August. The War Diary notes 'no event of importance during the day', but it does record that aircraft fired on them during the evening of the 8th August and at around 9 pm the 'enemy opened and intense bombardment of our line.' This may explain his death.
He was born on the 28 February 1898 at Mucklerammer, Drummaul and was the son of Robert and Jane Stewart, later of Main Street, Randalstown. Robert Stewart had married Jane Givens, the couple both of Moneyglass Grange, in Ballymena Register Office on the 9 December 1889.
His brother, Rifleman William Stewart, Royal Irish Rifles, was reported a POW.  He lived on Main Street, Randalstown [BWT] 20458 Samuel Stewart of the 16th Battalion, Canadian Infantry, was wounded in the head and was eventually discharged 'medically unfit'. He died on the 7 December 1966.
James Stewart is commemorated in Randalstown Old Congregation Presbyterian Church.

The Storey Family, Randalstown - David, William, Robert James C and Joseph
Local press photograph courtesy of N Henderson

STOREY, 19781 Rifleman David, 12th Royal Irish Rifles, born on the 6 June 1894 at Aughalish, Drummaul and the youngest son of the family, died on the 30th September 1918 and he is buried in Dadizeele British Cemetery.  He was the son of Joseph Storey, then said to be a grocer, and Isabella Craig. Publican Joseph Storey of Antrim had married Isabella S. Craig of Tannaghmore in 1st Ballymena Presbyterian Church on the 16 December 1887. His widow Isabella later lived at Feehogue, Randalstown.
Wounded: Robert Storey, Feehogue, Randalstown
1169 Robert Storey enlisted in the North Irish Horse on the 8th September 1914 and was on active service after the 1st May 1915. He transferred to the Mounted Military Police in February 1917 and was wounded in August 1917. He survived the war.
Robert Storey (snr), son of Henry and a printer, had married Rose McBurney in Newtownards RC Church on the 7th May 1886. Both were 22 years old. They had five children.  Henry was born on the the 4th July 1887 at Newtownards; the remainder at Ballydonnelly, Toome. These were Daniel, born 9th April 1889; William, born 3 January 1891; Robert, born 2nd December 1894; and John, born  8th June 1896. Rose appears to have died at this time and Robert married Catherine Harris in St Mary's RC Church, Moneyglass, Toomebridge on the 29th June 1896.
The children were living with their grandparents, Henry and Ellen Storey, at Ballydonnelly, Toome in 1901.
THOMPSON, 2246 Rifleman John, 11th Royal Irish Rifles, died 1st July 1916 and is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme.  He came from, Ballygrooby, Randalstown but cannot yet be identified definitively in records.
WARDEN, John, 56883, Private, New Zealand Reinforcements, died on the 24th September 1917 and is buried in Plymouth (Efford) Cemetery, England.  He was born on the 27 September 1883 and he was the son of farmer Samuel Warden and Sarah McAuley of Artlone, Randalstown, Co. Antrim. He was also a farmer.
Warden was killed in a tragic accident in Devon, England. Reinforcements H Company for the New Zealand Rifle Brigade had left Wellington on HMNZT 90, Ulimaroa, and had only just arrived in England. They left Friary Station, Plymouth at 3pm. Ten Privates were killed while on their way to join their comrades on Salisbury Plain for preliminary training.
At 3.50 pm the train approached Bere Ferrers. The soldiers hadn't eaten since breakfast at 6 am. They had been told the train would stop at Exeter, and that two men from each carriage would carry provisions from the brakevan, actually cups of tea and buns provided by the Mayoress's Comforts Fund. When the train made an unscheduled stop at Bere Ferrers, men in the rear section of the train decided that this must be Exeter, and breaking the rule of two from each carriage, jumped down. Some of them spilled onto the down-line track, just as the Waterloo to Plymouth Express rounded the sharp curve on its entry into Bere Ferrers. Although the fireman shouted a warning, and the train driver applied the brakes, the train pulled up about 400m beyond the station. Nine soldiers died instantly and another died the following morning in Tavistock Hospital. The inquest revealed that the men had got out of the train on the wrong side simply because they had assumed the door of entry was the correct door by which to to exit.
Uhlan Farm is in the centre of the map. Wieltje (NE of Ypres) and Plum Farm are marked with yellow dots.

WARWICK, 529 Corporal William Neville, 10th Royal Irish Rifles, died on 6th August 1917. 
10th Royal Irish Rifles had been at Plum Farm on the 5th August 1917 but had then moved to Brigade Reserve. On the 6th August, the location recorded as Uhlan Farm, the War Diary records that 'A' and 'D' Companies were 'withdrawn to old British line at night between Warwick Castle and Wieltje.' There is no mention of casualties.
He was born on the 10 March 1889 at Shane's Castle, Randalstown and he was the son of gardener Charles Warwick and his wife Emily Maria Davison. The couple, both aged 21 years, had married in St Patrick's Parish Church, on the 27 June 1888. He gave his address as Shane's Castle and she came from Clinty, Ballymena. 
William Neville Warwick is remembered on the Ypres Memorial (Menin Gate).

Captain Oswald Brooke Webb
WEBB,  Oswald Brooke,  Captain,  11th Royal Irish Rifles, died of wounds on the 3rd (CWGC says 4th) July 1916 from abdominal wounds received in 1st July - the record says he was hit 'the very moment our men slipped over parapet.'  He was taken to the Casualty Clearing Station and an officer there who knew him wrote to his brother and said,  'I saw him when he was brought into hospital, and thought he looked pretty bad, but he was quite conscious, and not suffering any pain. I was talking to him for a few minutes and he told me he got hit before he got past our wire. He was very pleased with the way his men went forward, and seemed quite cheerful'.
He was born on the 23 June 1880 and the son of late Charles James Webb, Old Bleach Linen Company, Randalstown and his wife Charlotte Ellen Brooke.  The couple had married in 1869.
Oswald Webb was married and he and his wife Kathleen had a 12 year old son. Captain Webb had written to him at boarding school from Martinsart on 30th June. He said, My Dear Patrick, Just a line to let you know I am all right … I hope you are getting on well at school ... Write good long letters to your mother, your ever loving father.’
He is buried in Warloy Baillon Communal Cemetery Extension, Somme.

Webb had been active in the Ulster Volunteer Force prior to the Great War.
Card courtesy of M. Stewart

WEIR, 12/19310 Rifleman Matthew, 12th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles, died of wounds aged 27 years at home on the 12 January 1919 and he is buried in Larne New Cemetery.

He was born on the 16 June 1892 at Drummaul, Randalstown and was the son of labourer William from Caddy and Charlotte Morgan from Drummaul. They had married in Randalstown's OC Presbyterian Church on the 31 March 1886.

The couple had moved to Larne before 1911. Mrs Charlotte Weir lived at 9, Coronation Terrace, Glynn Rd., Larne. Matthew was the brother of William James Weir and the consecutive numbers mean they enlisted together.

WEIR, 19311 Rifleman William James, 12th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles, born Drummaul, Randalstown on the 30 June 1890, died of wounds on the 10 August 1917 and aged 27 years.  He was the son of William and Charlotte Weir, nee Morgan, of Drummaul and husband of Nora Weir, nee Barr, of 20, Mill Brae, Larne, Co. Antrim. The couple had married on the 30 May 1915 in the Methodist Church, Larne. His brother Matthew also died.                                                                       See Virtual memorial.
WHITESIDE, 17701 Private Samuel, 59th Coy Machine Gun Corps (Infantry) and formerly of the 11th Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action on 30th November 1917.  He was the son of James and Emma Whiteside, nee Beckett, Ballytresna, Randalstown and had been born on the 23 December 1893. The couple had married in Randalstown OC Presbyterian Church on the 16 September 1887. 
Samuel is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial and in Randalstown Old Congregation Presbyterian Church. CWGC record him as the son of Emma Whiteside, of Ballytresna, Randalstown, Co. Antrim, and the late James Whiteside. See Virtual Memorial

Rifleman Samuel Woods 

WOODS, 19831 Rifleman Samuel, 12th Royal Irish Rifles, died on the 2nd September 1918.  On the 1st September 1918 his unit ‘relieved the 9th Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers in line running from Neuve Eglise … Two Companies in line, one Coy in Support & one Coy in reserve’. At 7 am on the 2nd September they ‘pushed forward the line along road running from Neuve Eglise to Nieppe.’ However, at ‘mid-day there were still enemy in Neuve Eglise. ‘C' Coy were detailed to clear the village by working round and entering it from the North east. At 4 pm we had joined up with the 1st Royal Irish Fusiliers on our left and 29th Division on our right. ‘D’ & ‘A’ Coys. pushed forward 300 yds. at 3 pm in front of road.’ The line then ran in front of the village, but 8 pm ‘with 3 Coys. in front and 1 Coy. in support the line was pushed forward to the Blue Line of trenches.’ These activities on the 2nd September brought casualties – ‘1 Officer and 10 Other Ranks killed. 3 Officers & 90 Other Ranks wounded.’
Samuel Woods was one of the killed. He was born on the 30 November 1892 at Ballygrooby, Drummaul and he was the son of William John Woods and Jane Richardson, of Daisy Hill, Feehogue, Randalstown. The couple, both workers in a local mill and both from Randalstown, had married in Drummaul Parish Church on the 13 October 1882.   Samuel Woods is buried in Wulverghem-Lindenhoek Road Military Cemetery.
His brother also served.

Lt George Neville Patrick Young, MC

YOUNG (MC), George Patrick Neville,  Lieutenant, 2nd Leinster Regiment, died on 25th July in Boulogne Hospital of wounds received earlier in July 1915.  He was the 23 year old son of  George Lawrence & Annie Young, Culdaff House, Donegal & of Millmount, Randalstown.

George Young was wounded on the night of the 10/11 July 1915. His friend Dennis Barnett reported to his mother that Young "got a shrapnel bullet nicely through the shoulder, and insisted on walking round the line to say good-bye to everyone before starting for the dressing station. There was no despondency there. He'll get a good holiday which he's earned if anyone did." Regrettably, he died of gangrene.

Samuels, Dorothy Gage (nee Young, married in 1913), Millmount, Randalstown was the wife of Captain Arthur Purefoy Irwin Samuels and she was also a sister of fellow 11th Bn. Royal Irish Rifles officer Guy Owen Lawrence Young and of George Neville Patrick Young (MC), Lieutenant, 2nd Leinster Regiment, who died on 25th July in Boulogne Hospital of wounds received on the 12th July 1915.

Drummaul St Brigid (Church of Ireland), Randalstown

Drummaul St Brigid (Church of Ireland Memorial, Randalstown)
Courtesy of Hugh McBride

Survived the Great War - 18/913 or 913 Rifleman David Logan, 'B' Coy, 3rd Bn Royal Irish Rifles

David Logan was the eldest son of farm labourer William John Logan and his wife Eliza. William John Logan, son of David and from Forsythe, Randalstown, married Eliza McIlvenna, daughter of Samuel of Drummaul, Randalstown in Randalstown OC Presbyterian Church on the 4th July 1895.
The family are living at Caddy, Drummaul in the census returns of 1901 and 1911, and at the latter date the couple said they had been married for sixteen years and that they had had seven children, all of whom were alive at the time. They listed David (15 & a linen weaver, born 10th December 1895), Samuel J (13), Robert (11), Mary (9), William J (6), Anna Matilda (4) and Susan (2). Another daughter called Maggie was later born on 8th July 1916.
David enlisted in the 18th Battalion on the 6th November 1915, and was designated 18/913. The unit was formed in Holywood in April 1915 as a Reserve Battalion, and it moved to Clandeboye in July 1915. It transferred to England in April 1918, going to Larkhill Camp where it was subsequently absorbed by 3rd (Reserve) Battalion. David wrote home at that time and gave his address as 913 Rfm. D. Logan, No. 12 Hut, 'B' Coy, 3rd RIR, No 10 Camp, Durrington, Salisbury Plain, Wilts.
913 or 18/913 left his regiment on the 17th September 1918, prior to the end of the war. His Medal Index Card reads ‘392/xvi/KR W.’  392 is the paragraph number, xvi the subsection - ‘No longer physically fit for war service’, KR is ‘King’s Regulations’. The ‘w’ means ‘wounded’, hence wounded sufficiently to be no longer fit for military service.